LGBTQ+ Free E-Books

Our Trans Loved One

 Written by PFLAG staff members, and created with the help of content experts, reviewers, and PFLAGers with experience to share, this publication is full of information, first-person stories, and expert input geared to those who have a loved one who has come out as trans or gender expansive.​ LGBTQ+ Affirming Resources 

Our Children

OUR CHILDREN offers a fresh eye parents, caregivers, families, and friends about what to do when a loved ones comes out. Full of useful knowledge, helpful tips, expert opinions and first-person stories, it's a must read for anyone looking to learn more about how to support LGBTQ loved ones...or looking for support for themselves. 

Guide to Being a Trans Ally

A publication from our Straight for Equality program, this guide will help you learn more about what transgender means, develop competency around talking about the issue, become better informed about the challenges that many trans people face, and know specific ways that you can be a strong trans ally. 

Christian Free Audio Books

***Disclosure***

These books were all written over a century ago. By listening to these audio recordings please keep in mind the era/society they are from.


Some of these pieces may mention the LGBTQ+ in some way while others may not. 

The Bridge of History Over the Gulf of Time

A Popular View of the Historical Evidence for the Truth of Christianity


 Thomas COOPER (1805 - 1892) 


 Written by the former skeptic, poet, and scholar, Thomas Cooper, The Bridge of History Over the Gulf of Time admirably sets forth a winsome defense of Christianity. Written as the substance of fourteen years of lectures, at the request of his hearers, Cooper leads his reader across the bridge of history, through the centuries, tracing Christianity. At last, he addresses "Leben Jesu" by Dr. David Friedrich Strauss, discusses the historicity of the four Gospels, and offers some concluding evidences for the truth of Christianity. 

An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine

John Henry NEWMAN (1801 - 1890) 


After a long struggle against liberal tendencies in the Church of England and an unsuccessful attempt to establish the position of Anglicanism as a branch of historical Christianity whose doctrines could be proven to be identical with those of the primitive Church, John Henry Newman came to the painful realization that he could no longer remain a member of the Anglican Church. Increasingly drawn to Catholicism, he was nevertheless repulsed by the idea that the Roman Church, while preserving many ancient doctrines, had contaminated the faith by mixing into it its own invented traditions. Or could it be that these "new" doctrines were truly already present from the beginning, having only become more explicit and better understood with the passage of the centuries? "So, I determined to write an essay on Doctrinal Development; and then, if, at the end of it, my convictions in favor of the Roman Church were not weaker, to make up my mind to seek admission into her fold" (Newman, Apologia Pro Vita Sua). 

A First Century Message to Twentieth Century Christians

G. Campbell MORGAN (1863 - 1945) 


G. Campbell Morgan was one of the leading evangelical preachers of his day. He began preaching at age 13 and by age 26 was teaching at the Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, Illinois. He returned to England in 1904 to become pastor at Westminster Chapel in London. He was a contemporary and friend Martyn Lloyd-Jones, F. B. Meyer and Charles Spurgeon.

In this book, Morgan examines the letters to the seven churches of Asia which begin the book of Revelation in the New Testament. Over 1900 years have passed, and yet our churches today face many of the same temptations, struggles and challenges as those faced by these first century believers. Morgan brings home how the messages of Jesus to these early churches are equally applicable to our churches today. Would our own church receive Jesus’ praise? Or does our church need to answer Jesus’ call to repent and return to true worship?  

Foxe's Book of Martyrs Vol 1

A History of the Lives, Sufferings, and Triumphant Deaths of the Early Christian and the Protestant Martyrs


John FOXE (1516 - 1587) and William Byron FORBUSH (1868 - 1927) 


The Book of Martyrs, by John Foxe, is an English Protestant account of the persecutions of Protestants, many of whom had died for their beliefs within the decade immediately preceding its first publication. It was first published by John Day, in 1563. Lavishly illustrated with many woodcuts, it was the largest publishing project undertaken in Britain up to that time. Commonly known as, “Foxe’s Book of Martyrs”, the work’s full title begins with “Actes and Monuments of these Latter and Perillous Days, Touching Matters of the Church.” There were many subsequent editions, by Day, and by other editors down through the years. Foxe’s original work was enormous (the second edition filling two heavy folio volumes with a total of 2,300 pages, estimated to be twice as long as Edward Gibbon’s “Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.” This edition is much abridged from Foxe’s original. 

Foxe's Book of Martyrs Vol 2

A History of the Lives, Sufferings, and Triumphant Deaths of the Early Christian and the Protestant Martyrs


John FOXE (1516 - 1587) and William Byron FORBUSH (1868 - 1927) 


The Book of Martyrs, by John Foxe, is an English Protestant account of the persecutions of Protestants, many of whom had died for their beliefs within the decade immediately preceding its first publication. It was first published by John Day, in 1563. Lavishly illustrated with many woodcuts, it was the largest publishing project undertaken in Britain up to that time. Commonly known as, "Foxe's Book of Martyrs", the work's full title begins with "Actes and Monuments of these Latter and Perillous Days, Touching Matters of the Church." There were many subsequent editions, by Day, and by other editors down through the years. Foxe's original work was enormous (the second edition filling two heavy folio volumes with a total of 2,300 pages, estimated to be twice as long as Edward Gibbon's "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire." This edition is much abridged from Foxe's original.

This book was first published shortly after the death of Queen Mary. During Mary's reign, common people of Protestant Christian faith were publicly burned at the stake in an attempt to eliminate dissension from Catholic doctrines.

Foxe's account of Mary's reign and its martyrdoms form a significant part of the work. Foxe intended to justify the foundation of the Church of England as a continuation of the true and faithful ancient church, rather than as a new denomination.

The work has a historic perspective. It begins with early Christian martyrs, and continues with the Inquisition, Wycliffe, and the Marian Persecutions.

For the English Church, Foxe's book remains a fundamental witness to the sufferings of faithful Christian people at the hands of the anti-Protestant Roman Catholic authorities, and to the miracle of their endurance unto death.

Roman Catholics often view Foxe's record of this period as extremely partisan and the primary propaganda piece for English anti-Catholicism. Among other objections, the accuracy of Foxe's claims regarding martyrdoms under Mary ignore the mingled political and religious aspects of the time period. Some of the victims may have been intent on removing Mary from the throne. Although the work is more accurate when dealing with events during Foxe's time, it is generally not a correct or impartial account of the period, and includes occasional "willful falsification of evidence".